Category Fact Sheets

Sustainable use of water resources in the transboundary Padshaota river basin

Population growth and climate change are factors influencing the decrease in water resources of the transboundary Padshaota River, which runs through Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. As such, there is an urgent need to improve how the river’s water resources are managed. The Padshaota River originates in Kyrgyzstan in the Chatkal Range, flows through Uzbekistan’s Namangan Oblast, and then flows back into Kyrgyzstan. The river is fed by mountain glaciers, has a mean basin elevation of about 2,000 metres above sea level, is about 130 km in length, and has a catchment area of 443 km2. Average annual discharge is estimated at 5.5 m3 per second...

Rehabilitation of ‘Zumratsho’ headwork in Isfara, Tajikistan

The Isfara River originates in Kyrgyzstan on the northern slopes of the Turkestan Range and flows north into Tajikistan through the Ferghana Valley, towards the Syr Darya River. It measures about 120 km in total.  The catchment area covers Batken Oblast (administrative district) in Kyrgyzstan and Sughd Oblast in Tajikistan, and includes Uzbek territories at the tail-end of the basin. The river, historically a tributary of the Syr Darya, merges at its mouth with the Great Fergana Canal. Currently, the canal’s water is exploited almost entirely for irrigation by the local population before it actually reaches the Syr Darya...

Study tour on the Self-Management of Water and Soil Utilisation of Lower River Basin Units in Germany

Although centralised planning and management of water resources continues to predominate in the five Central Asian States, reform of the current water management system is on-going in most of them. The aim is to complete the transition of major functions to the local level.
A study tour was conducted for Central Asian representatives of national ministries concerned with water and land resources management and for the representatives of local water administrations. The purpose of the tour was the study of methods for the self-administration of water and soil utilisation in Germany...

Supporting IWRM in Turkmenistan

Turkmenistan’s water resources are limited due to extremely low precipitation. The Turkmen lowland receives just 100-150 mm annual precipitation and is subject to high evaporation. Even the high mountains in the Kopet Dag and Balkan ranges do not supply permanently running rivers. Thus, only the Murgab and Tedjen rivers formed in the neighbouring countries of Afghanistan and Iran are relevant. However, the main source of water is the Amu Darya River. It supplies water to the northern part of the country and, through the Karakum Canal, the southern part of the country between Mary and Ashgabat.

The permanent water supply led to the formation...

Introducing basin planning approach in Cepekyab, Turkmenistan

Context
The EU project ‘Water Management and Basin Organisations in Central Asia’ (WMBOCA) is being implemented by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH (German Society for International Cooperation). WMBOCA aims to build capacity in regional water cooperation and sustainable water resources management in smaller transboundary river basins.

Moreover, WMBOCA activities focus on the introduction of the basin approach, for which the EU Water Framework Directive is the guiding concept...

Supporting basin planning and management in Turkmenistan

Context
Across large areas, the surface water and groundwater resour-
ces of Turkmenistan are extremely scarce, due to the country’s predominantly desert climate and average annual precipitation of 100-150 mm. The Amu Darya River is the main source of water in the northern part of the country, while the southern regions near the Kopet Dag Mountains are mainly served by the Karakum Canal, which was constructed in the middle of 20th century.

Other water resources are the Murgab and the Tedjen rivers, which run into Turkmenistan from Afghanistan and Iran, and are mainly supplied by runoff from the northern Hindukush Mountains...

Eine Quelle des Friedens – Grenzüberschreitendes Wassermanagement in Zentralasien

Eine Quelle des Friedens – Grenzüberschreitendes Wassermanagement in ZentralasienZentralasien ist eine Region mit knappen Wasserressourcen, die von den Auswirkungen des globalen Klimawandels und der chronischen Übernutzung der vorhandenen Reserven besonders betroffen ist. Gleichzeitig sind die Volkswirtschaften der fünf zentralasiatischen Staaten durch die gemeinsame Nutzung des Flusswassers der beiden großen Flüsse Syr Darja und Amu Darja sowie anderer grenzüberschreitender Flussgebiete eng miteinander verbunden...

A Source of Peace – Transboundary Water Management in Central Asia

2011-02-07_Fact-Sheet_BBIC-and-HW_UZ-covershot Rehabilitation of the Bad Bad irrigation canal and its headwork

 Irrigated agriculture is the basis of the Uzbek economy and the main source of employ...